We match adoptive families with children waiting for adoption. Children up for adoption come from unwed mothers or families who cannot provide a good home for them to grow up. Most children available for adoption are infants.

We will facilitate an open or closed adoption, based on preferences from both giving and receiving parties.

Closed adoption is still the most common route in Singapore. For adoptive parents, we will share the child’s information and family background with adoptive couples in details. For birth parents, we will share non-personal information upon request with the consent of the adoptive parents.

We will share profiles of children waiting for adoption and photos of children for adoption, so that potential adoptive parents have the full background before viewing the baby. We will arrange for adoptive parents to meet the child and give plenty of time to decide. We know that the decision to adopt a child from abroad is not easy, so we are always listening to provide information and do all we can to make the adoption from abroad journey a smooth and fulfilling experience.

>>> You might want read When Love Takes You In: Darren and Melanie Soh’s Adoption Story<<<

As there are always more adoptive parents than babies available for adoption, our clients will queue for their opportunities. We encourage adoptive parents to park your names with us, so that we can come back to you when we have a suitable baby.

We place babies from Vietnam and Malaysia. Babies waiting for adoption are put up directly by birth parents, or most of the time from unwed birth mothers. Babies available for adoptions are mostly infants of between 1 and 6 months old. Adoptive parents will have the opportunity to view the baby and have the full medical records before proceeding with the adoption. We would recommend you travel to Vietnam or Malaysia to view the baby, and set aside 2-3 days for this trip.

We will follow through and guide you step by step on the medical check in Singapore, legal procedures with the Family Court, and application with ICA until baby receives Citizenship in Singapore.

We are always willing to assist you with any questions regarding child adoption in Singapore. Please do not hesitate to give us a call (+65) 90680573 or drop us an email to singaporeadoptionagency@yahoo.com.sg.

4 Comments

  • Daniel Chua
    Posted December 29, 2018 11:32 pm 0Likes

    Hi
    I am Daniel, married man 48 years old looking to adopt a child.
    Can advise how I should proceed?
    Thanks

    • John Nguyen
      Posted January 1, 2019 2:32 pm 0Likes

      Hi Daniel,

      You can find out more information about the process of adoption at the following website:
      https://www.msf.gov.sg/Adoption/Pages/default.aspx

      The next step is to attend the Pre-adoption briefing at any of the social services centers listed on MSF’s website.
      In Singapore, most couples go for a foreign born baby, as Singaporean babies are not easily available. If you opt for a local baby, you don’t need to do a Home Study Report, but the waiting time can be as long as 10 years.

      Regards,
      John Nguyen

  • Vasanth
    Posted December 30, 2018 11:26 pm 0Likes

    Hi there..

    I’m vasanth here.. married male 34years old, I wanna adopt a child, can help me advice on how to process

    • John Nguyen
      Posted January 1, 2019 2:22 pm 0Likes

      Hi Vasanth, first you will need to register for a pre-adoption briefing. This workshop will guide you through the adoption process and help you decide whether you want to go with a local baby or foreign baby. You can register for the pre-adoption briefing at the following website:
      https://www.msf.gov.sg/Adoption/Pages/default.aspx

      If you decide to adopt a foreign baby, you need to complete a Home Study Report, or HSR. Once your HSR is approved, you can approach private adoption agency (like ourselves) to look for a baby.
      If you go for a local baby, expect longer waiting time. You an approach Touch or Apkim Social Service Centers for local babies.
      Hope this helps.
      Cheers,
      John Nguyen

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